Indian Income Tax

Value Added Taxes (VAT) in India

Value Added Tax (VAT) is nothing but a general consumption tax that is assessed on the value added to goods & services. It is the indirect tax on the consumption of the goods, paid by its original producers upon the change in goods or upon the transfer of the goods to its ultimate consumers. It is based on the value of the goods, added by the transferor. It is the tax in relation to the difference of the value added by the transferor and not just a profit.

All over the world, VAT is payable on the goods and services as they form a part of national GDP. More than130 countries worldwide have introduced VAT over the past 3 decades; India being amongst the last few to introduce it.

It means every seller of goods and service providers charges the tax after availing the input tax credit. It is the form of collecting sales tax under which tax is collected in each stage on the value added of the goods. In practice, the dealer charges the tax on the full price of the goods, sold to the consumer and at every end of the tax period reduces the tax collected on sale and tax charged to him by the dealers from whom he purchased the goods and deposits such amount of tax in government treasury.

VAT is a multi-stage tax, levied only on value that is added at each stage in the cycle of production of goods and services with the provision of a set-off for the tax paid at earlier stages in the cycle/chain. The aim is to avoid 'cascading', which can have a snowballing effect on the prices. It is assumed that because of cross-checking in a multi-staged tax; tax evasion would be checked, hence resulting in higher revenues to the government.

Importance of VAT in India

India, particularly being a trading community, has always believed in accepting and adopting loopholes in any system administered by State or Centre. If a well-administered system comes in, it will not only close options for traders and businessmen to evade paying their taxes, but also make sure that they'll be compelled to keep proper records of sales and purchases.

Under the VAT system, no exemptions are given and a tax will be levied at every stage of manufacture of a product. At every stage of value-addition, the tax that is levied on the inputs can be claimed back from tax authorities.

At a macro level, two issues make the introduction of VAT critical for India

Industry watchers believe that the VAT system, if enforced properly, will form part of the fiscal consolidation strategy for the country. It could, in fact, help address issues like fiscal deficit problem. Also the revenues estimated to be collected can actually mean lowering of fiscal deficit burden for the government.

International Monetary Fund (IMF), in the semi-annual World Economic Outlook expressed its concern for India's large fiscal deficit - at 10 per cent of GDP.

Moreover any globally accepted tax administrative system would only help India integrate better in the World Trade Organization regime.

Advantages of VAT

  1. Coverage If the tax is considered on a retail level, it offers all the economic advantages of a tax of the entire retail price within its scope. The direct payment of tax spreads out over a large number of firms instead of being concentrated only on particular groups, such as wholesalers & retailers.

  2. Revenue Security - Under VAT only buyers at the final stage have an interest in undervaluing their purchases, as the deduction system ensures that buyers at earlier stages are refunded the taxes on their purchases. Therefore, tax losses due to undervaluation will be limited to the value added at the last stage.

    Secondly, under VAT, if the payment of tax is avoided at one stage nothing will be lost if it is picked up at later stage. Even if it is not picked up later, the government will at least have collected the VAT paid at previous stages. Where as if evasion takes place at the final/last stage the state will lose only tax on the value added at that particular point.

  3. Selectivity - VAT is selectively applied to specific goods & business entities. In addition, VAT does not burden capital goods because of the consumption-type. VAT gives full credit for tax included on purchases of capital goods.

  4. Co-ordination of VAT with direct taxation - Most taxpayers cheat on sales not to evade VAT but to evade their personal and corporate income taxes. Operation of VAT resembles that of the income tax and an effective VAT greatly helps in income tax administration and revenue collection.

To know more about advantages of VAT click here: Advantages of VAT

Disadvantages of VAT

  1. VAT is regressive
  2. VAT is difficult to operate from position of both administration and business
  3. VAT is inflationary
  4. VAT favors capital intensive firms

Items covered under VAT

  • All business transactions that are carried on within a State by individuals/partnerships/ companies etc. will be covered under VAT.

  • More than 550 items are covered under the new Indian VAT regime out of which 46 natural & unprocessed local products will be exempt from VAT

  • Nearly 270 items including drugs and medicines, all industrial and agricultural inputs, capital goods as well as declared goods would attract 4 % VAT in India.

  • The remaining items would attract 12.5 % VAT. Precious metals such as gold and bullion will be taxed at 1%.

  • Petrol and diesel are kept out of the VAT regime in India.

Tax implication under Value Added Tax Act

Seller Buyer Selling Price (Excluding Tax) Tax Rate Invoice value (InclTax) Tax Payable Tax Credit Net TaxOutflow
AB1004% CST104404.00
BC11412.5% VAT128.2514.250*14.25
CD12412.5% VAT139.5015.5014.251.25
DConsumer13412.5% VAT150.7516.7515.501.25
Total to Govt.VAT CST16.75 4.00

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VAT In Andhra Pradesh | VAT In Delhi | VAT In Gujarat | VAT In Karnataka | VAT In Kerala | VAT In Maharashtra | VAT In Madhya Pradesh | VAT In Orissa | VAT In Rajasthan | VAT In Tamil Nadu | VAT In Uttaranchal | VAT In Uttar Pradesh | VAT In West Bangal
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